CAELIA, defined

Caelia, -ae (f) – a type of beer made in Spain Caelia is described in a recent passage by Florus. It is a type of beer (perhaps, wheat) that was made in the Numantine and Iberian territories. Variants on the word include “celia, celea, cerea, ceria, celicia.” The earliest reference to this word comes from…

Florus, Epitome Bellorum Omnium Annorum 1.34

Sic redacto in disciplinam milite commissa acies, quodque nemo visurum se umquam speraverat factum, ut fugientes Numantinos quisquam videret. Dedere etiam se volebant, si toleranda viris imperarentur. Sed cum Scipio veram vellet et sine exceptione victoriam, eo necessitatum conpulsi primum ut destinata morte in proelium ruerent, cum se prius epulis quasi inferiis implevissent carnis semicrudae et…

HBW: Emmer and Einkorn Beer

As part of this ongoing series of homebrewing ancient grains, I continue to explore the viability of brewing with emmer and einkorn. Previously, I malted an emmer and attempted to brew an emmer beer. I suspected that my lack of success was due to the tough exerior of the grain that resulted in difficulties during the…

Emmer in Brewing: A Review

This is part of an ongoing homebrewing series about the brewing of ancient grains. Emmer (Triticum dicoccum) is a tetraploid, hulled wheat that was commonly grown in antiquity. Hulled wheats, like emmer and einkorn (a diploid wheat), are among the most ancient domesticated grains (Ozkan, et al. 2011; Marconi, et al. 2013; Emody, et al….

Tasting no(a)tes: a 100% oats ale

A few months ago, Kyle discussed a poem by emperor Julian the Apostate that mentions oats as a possible ingredient used to brew beer by the Gauls. While he is now keeping himself busy with other grains used by the Gauls, this does not mean BCS is no longer interested in oat-based beers. Thus, when…

Classical Beer Review: Creature Comforts Bibo

A few weeks ago, I reviewed Creature Comforts’ Athena. When we visited the tap room, they actually had another Classically-themed beer on draft: Bibo. Bibo is a pilsner with “an enormous amount of the Classic Czech Saaz and a touch of Motueka hops,” according to its brewers. It is golden yellow in color and tastes…

HBW: Emmer Beer (Brewing), Pt. 1

Recently, I attempted to brew a 100% malted emmer beer (Malting Process). Emmer, Triticum dicoccum, is a hulled, tetraploid wheat that was commonly used for brewing by the Egyptians and Gauls (Celtic European tribes). On Monday, I translated several references to emmer in Greco-Roman literature and I will soon have a post detailing the modern…

Emmer in Antiquity

For this week’s Classical text, I include a non-exhaustive list of Greco-Roman references to emmer. This serves to complement the ongoing HBW series, brewing ancient grains – emmer beer is currently on deck (malt, brew pt.1, brew pt.2, taste). This list supplements, but does not replace, Nelson’s list (2001, 98) in which he describes the…

Classical Beer Review: Wicked Weed Genesis

Last weekend, we took a trip down to Knoxville, TN to see friends and went to Asheville, NC on the way back to have some beers. As Asheville is nicknamed Beer City, there were plenty of breweries to visit and too little time to go to them all! The ones we could include in this…

HBW: Emmer Beer Pt. 1

After much discussion this summer about the Grains of Gaul, I have decided to brew beer with traditional (ancient) Celtic and (modern) non-traditional grains. In this initial installment, I malt and brew with emmer, triticum dicoccum, a most ancient variety of robust wheat. In ancient Greek, emmer is sometimes referred to as ὂλυρα or τραγός…

Classical Beer Review: Ayinger Celebrator

Almost a year after our initial request, we are back with our third Classically-themed beer to review that was suggested to us by YOU! Me, you might think? Yes, in October 2016 we asked our followers on social media and members of various online beer groups this very important question: which is your favorite Classically-themed…

Konuza II: Hecataeus and the Hippocratic Corpus

In a previous post, I explained my reasons for reopening the konuza case. To recap: we initially researched the hypothesis that the konuza mentioned as an adjunct to a beer brewed by the Paeonians could be the root of elecampane (inula helenium). A more detailed investigation reveals that this may not be the case and…